Mailing Just Got More Expensive With Forever Stamp’s Biggest Price Increase

American’s will be paying more for mailing letters and packaging beginning now!

The biggest price increase in the history of the US Postal service for the first-class Forever stamp increased by a nickel on Sunday from 50 cents to 55 cents, according to the Associated Press. The reason for the price increase is to make up for Americans using the US Postal service less and less to send letters. The Postal Service has been running its services in the red for years.

In 2018 $3.9 billon was lost due to the decrease in mail volume by about 2.1 pieces.  Americans are using other means to communicateand send money to each other.

According to Postmaster General Megan Brennan, “The flawed business model imposed by law continues to be the root cause of our financial instability.” And the USA Today reported that despite the increase in packaging growth, 2018 was the 12th year in a row of a loss in revenue for the US Postal Service.

Not only have letter prices increased but so have packaging prices increased. Priority Mail prices have increased by 70 cents from $7.20 to $7.90 for small boxes and from $13.65 to $14.35. While the letter volume has decreased the packaging volume has grown with almost half a billon more packages in 2018 compared to 2017. 

However the cost of postcards and the cost per additional letter ounce will not increase.  Postcards will remain at 35 cents while cost per additional letter ounce will decrease from 21 cents to 15 cents.

Remember the years before the Forever stamps, when the price of a stamp increased and we had to purchase one or two cent stamps to add to our old first class stamps to meet the price of the new postage cost on a first class letter?  

Well, in 2007 the Forever stamps were created to eliminate that inconvenience so that every time you mailed a one ounce first class letter it could be used even if the price of the first class stamp increased. And by 2011, all of the first class stamps became the new forever stamps. 

Some users on social networks have wondered if the US Postal Service was inadvertently creating an opportunity for some to make a profit out of the Forever stamps. 

However, Washington Post columnist Allan Sloan doesn’t believe that Forever stamps are a viable money making project as American’s will be paying more for mailing letters and packaging beginning now!

The biggest price increase in the history of the US Postal service for the first-class Forever stamp increased by a nickel on Sunday from 50 cents to 55 cents, according to the Associated Press. The reason for the price increase is to make up for Americans using the US Postal service less and less to send letters. The Postal Service has been running its services in the red for years.

In 2018 $3.9 billon was lost due to the decrease in mail volume by about 2.1 pieces.  Americans are using other means to communicateand send money to each other.

According to Postmaster General Megan Brennan, “The flawed business model imposed by law continues to be the root cause of our financial instability.” And the USA Today reported that despite the increase in packaging growth, 2018 was the 12th year in a row of a loss in revenue for the US Postal Service.

Not only have letter prices increased but so have packaging prices increased. Priority Mail prices have increased by 70 cents from $7.20 to $7.90 for small boxes and from $13.65 to $14.35. While the letter volume has decreased the packaging volume has grown with almost half a billon more packages in 2018 compared to 2017. 

However the cost of postcards and the cost per additional letter ounce will not increase.  Postcards will remain at 35 cents while cost per additional letter ounce will decrease from 21 cents to 15 cents.

Remember the years before the Forever stamps, when the price of a stamp increased and we had to purchase one or two cent stamps to add to our old first class stamps to meet the price of the new postage cost on a first class letter?  

Well, in 2007 the Forever stamps were created to eliminate that inconvenience so that every time you mailed a one ounce first class letter it could be used even if the price of the first class stamp increased. And by 2011, all of the first class stamps became the new forever stamps. 

Some users on social networks have wondered if the US Postal Service was inadvertently creating an opportunity for some to make a profit out of the Forever stamps. 

However, Washington Post columnist Allan Sloan doesn’t believe that Forever stamps are a viable money making project because currently they don’t produce any income and the average postal customer really can’t purchase enough quantity of the stamps to sell and make any serious money.